Week 8: Keeping Your Friends

More Than Enough Essentials Fall 2020 Week 8: Keeping Your Friends

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    • #72338
      [email protected]
      CAFO Staff

      Reflecting on the passage in Acts 18 about Apollos, share a time when someone gently came alongside of you in your naivete and helped you grow.

       

    • #73097
      Jason Grewe
      Participant

      I noticed Apollos was a God-fearer, one who spoke out about that which he did know, whose heart was for the community to see Jesus as he did, and also was teachable as he encountered Priscilla and Aquila who gave him a fuller understanding (more context). As a result he went from “one who taught” about Jesus to one who “vigorously refuted his Jewish opponents in public debate”. His effectiveness and impact increased as a result.

      I like this question because it makes me think of those who have had a role in teaching me and encouraging me, but my mind takes it a slightly different direction asking “do I still have the right mindset to be guided?” “Is my overall goal in becoming the best version of myself or is it making the most impact the way that I currently see/define impact”. “If someone wants to invest in me, am I willing to receive it, or do I question and critique them?”

      Jerry Heyward. He was a friend and a pastor of mine who showed me how to have a daily relationship with Jesus, not just a religious works based transactional relationship with Him. “I can do this, God…” “Look how I helped that person God…” Without ever saying the words, he guided me in study and asked me questions and helped me to see that a lot of my good and quasi philanthropic efforts were a way to please “God’s people” and win their approval or accolades rather than doing them for an audience of One.

      • #73987
        [email protected]
        CAFO Staff

        I love the focus on yourself here. Am I teachable? is an important question!

    • #73154
      Maren Vallerand
      Participant

      A dear friend of mine has gently challenged me when my messaging, however well intentioned, was incomplete. While Apollos had yet to hear and learn about Christ post John’s baptism and his knowledge was therefore incomplete, I think the “curse of knowledge” can also hinder. At times I don’t include the fullness of a certain message, assuming the listener already has that additional context in mind. This, I have been rightly reminded by my gracious friend, may lead to confusion. This correction felt less like a critique and more like an invitation; I’m very grateful for the opportunity to recognize, learn, and grow.

      • #73988
        [email protected]
        CAFO Staff

        I love that phrasing – less like a critique, more like an invitation. I think that is something I would love to focus on, even with simple things with me kids. How do I speak in a way that feels like an invitation. Thanks Maren.

    • #73155
      Ryan Keith
      Participant

      I was once in Zimbabwe trying to help local farmers grow corn through a method called Foundations for Farming, which was getting 300% yield over traditional farming. The organization I was with was funding the expansion of this across about 1,000 homesteads in southern Zimbabwe. We were thrilled at how people were breaking cycles of poverty and malnutrition, as well as a reduction in children becoming orphaned. I was meeting with a woman who had chosen not to adopt this method, instead choosing to grow thatch. I was frustrated with her and the village leaders who were encouraging her, while her family was starving still. After asking questions for quite awhile about why she would choose this path, she helped me see that if she would make it through one harvest season, she’d be the sole provider for thatch in the whole region, as almost everyone was now growing this corn. We had unintentionally removed all other crops through this method’s success. While good, this entrepreneur was making a wiser choice to have thatch that villagers would need AND she’d have a corner on the market. Sometimes the one we are trying to help is actually the teacher. I find that’s often the case, actually. I was speaking about what I knew, but she had answers to questions I wasn’t even asking.

    • #73156
      Wendy Cheek
      Participant

      So I’m a volunteer running a ministry of volunteers 🙂 My background is in wildlife ecology and environmental education, so I was a bit out of my element when God called me out to start this ministry. Thankfully, I’ve had several church staffers over the years that have helped me to put structure to my passion. They have given me a basic models to work from and philosophies to keep in mind.  They give me a space to talk things through out loud (I’ve discovered I’m a verbal processor!!) and have helped me focus on ways to ensure others could follow, could get involved and could replicate what we’re doing in their own church. The church staff is sometimes a little shy on giving much critical/constructive feedback, which I actually crave, presumably because I’m a volunteer and they don’t want to lose me 🙂 But, they have been great encouragers, gently guiding me and giving me the ministry structure/help they know I need. 🙂

      • #73990
        [email protected]
        CAFO Staff

        Wendy , it is one of my favorite things to hear where foster care advocates started. I may be a nerdy Georgia Tech educated Kindergarten teacher – but I have found my place here! 🙂 Thanks for sharing.

    • #73161
      Jamie Bleakley
      Participant

      A couple years ago, along with another couple, started a business. We were extremely blessed to have small business owners in our church family that were extremely encouraging and helpful. One of the members that is in a similar field shared her paperwork and policies so we did not have to reinvent what had already been creative. Another member, encouraged me by gently scolded me not to apologize for God’s blessings. Our business has done well and we have not had many of the speed bumps that others had— she reminded me that God will reward obedience and that is not something to hide or feel guilty about.

    • #73163
      [email protected]
      Participant

      Recently, I was talking with my Aunt, who is now retired, but spent her career as a social worker, in Family Services. I was asking her a lot of questions about her career experiences in New York, and hearing her talk about how she was able to help families, and what that practically looked like, brought a greater understanding, to me, of how the state works.

    • #73168
      Deborah West
      Participant

      After 6 years of leading a team of volunteers as a volunteer myself, I am now on staff. The transition is largely due to a conversation this time last year with my pastor. He wanted me to see this ministry like planting a church, as in, it had gone as far as it could go without more time being devoted to developing relationships in the churches and communities we serve and educating the community on the need for more foster families and more support for those in the trenches. I struggled with the thought of using ministry funds to pay my salary instead of being used to do the work. He said, “The work doesn’t get done without you or someone doing what you do. It’s gone as far as it can on the limited time you have, and it’s time for a change. Why can you advocate for everyone but yourself?!” I didn’t know how badly I needed to hear it put that way until he said it. I’m grateful.

       

      • #73991
        [email protected]
        CAFO Staff

        Sounds like wise pastor Deb! I think relationship is at the core of so much, and it can only be built by people and time! You are valuable!

    • #73706
      [email protected]
      Participant

      When I first started with Child Bridge, another of our Regional Directors scheduled weekly meetings with me to go over the basics of foster care in Montana. He patiently explained all of the initials, as well as the workings and relationship between our org., foster families, and the state. His patience and help have been so beneficial to me.

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