Module Five: Foster Care

OVC Essentials Spring 2020 Module Five: Foster Care

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    • #64591
      Leah St. Pierre
      CAFO Staff

      Share about your reactions to the “Removed Documentary” and Josh Shipp’s “One Caring Adult Away”.  Reflect on the complex stories and experiences of foster care you heard about in the content this week and how examples like these inform your vision for your personal or community involvement.

      OR

      How do you feel that you and/or your church community could begin to more intentionally engage the foster care community in your area? Is there a particular way that God may be calling you to respond from this week’s lesson?

    • #65365
      Jacob Keeler
      Participant

      Hi all,

      This week’s topic is one close to my heart and our mission at Horizon. We are actively transitioning our model from residential to alternative care, specifically focused on non-kinship care within an international context.

      As we move in this direction, one of the biggest push backs we are getting is around accountability. Though my instinct is that accountability is ultimately created by recruiting the right people and establishing the right processes, for some reason we seem to “feel” a greater sense of control and accountability within a confined community rather than relying on partnerships within the community. I’m wondering if anyone has any helpful resources and/or statistics around establishing accountability within a foster care versus accountability within residential care. Please share if you do!

      Blessings,

      Jacob

      • #65386
        Philip Douce
        Participant

        Jacob,

        I am interested in your journey of moving from residential to alternative care in your organization. I also find it so interesting that your biggest push-back is the accountability piece. Where is this push-back coming from? staff, participants, board of directors, supporters???

        I like the way you think and agree that accountability is about recruiting the right people and creating the right systems. But also understand the feeling of greater control within the confines of a closed system. I am curious to know what information you find and/or how this continues to play out in your context. Thanks for sharing and inviting in to this process.

    • #65366
      Olivia Milliner
      Participant

      Being relatively new to the world of foster and adoption, my poorly constructed preconceived notions were brought to light this week. Going into this, all I’d ever heard about foster care was “it is so hard” or “the children are broken” or “it’s too dangerous”. When I was watching “Removed”, I was struck when she said “my past is not my fault”. Josh Shipp furthers this when he shares his story of change. “One caring adult away” rings so true! While I’ve been going through this content and sharing what I’ve learned, I’ve received backlash from family members about the possibility that I could be interested in fostering one day. The more I learn the more I think, “someone has to step up for them”. I was encouraged by the Foster Movement Podcast when they interviewed the adult adoptee. Her story proved that everyone needs a family, no matter how old they are or where they are in life!

      • #65428
        Heather Hall
        Participant

        Olivia–I too was confronted with a lot of my preconceived notions throughout this week’s content.  The fact that their past is not their fault is such an important point to focus on, especially in difficult times.  So much of the content from previous weeks, like topics such as attachment, and this week’s content go hand-in-hand when figuring out how to navigate difficult situations, especially with older foster kids.  Learning this information is a great place to start in order to start “stepping-up” for them.

    • #65369
      Debbie Douce
      Participant

      Thirty five years ago my husband and I left our profession as public school teachers to become the first houseparents of an emergency shelter. We were young and idealistic. The choice to make this change came out of a strong desire to love the broken child at a deeper level than was possible as teachers.

      It was an amazing training ground for us that continues to impact the decisions we make today to love the orphan and the vulnerable. The director and founder of the non-for-profit organization, a foster parent and nurse, saw the great need for reducing the trauma of a child removed from their home by providing a space where siblings could be kept together, and the children could remain in their current school setting during the thirty day window of determining the next steps for the child.

      We had 250 children come through the home in the two and half years we were the house parents. We also had two small children of our own. Maximum capacity was 12, and we were almost always full. It was so intense at times that many memories are a blur. They were some of my happiest and most sorrowful days. I am still undone by some of those memories that do remain unsettlingly clear.

      The 12 year old girl asking me every night for the month she stayed with us if we would adopt her, “I know you guys don’t adopt, but please, please just adopt me”. The six year old who could not sleep due to trauma, and so Phil patiently took him jogging each evening. The little boy who held onto the legs of the dining room table, screaming to not be taken when he was relocated to a longer term foster setting. The eight year old boy who was placed in a pre-adoptive home, a perfect forever family, but it turned out that the evangelical pastor father was sexually abusing him… and we had insisted that he go for the visits, even though he said he didn’t want to. The teen girl who was placed with us only one week but later came to visit us at the hospital after our son was born, a two hundred pound dark-skinned girl who told them she was there to see her parents and new little brother. The angry and acting out teenage boy. Phil bought boxing gloves to let him duke it out with him every evening. A infant born addicted to drugs. Her name was Tequila.

      We must have looked odd to those looking in, such a large menagerie of a family. And yet many people responded with love and support, strangers as well as friends and family. What an encouragement that was to us! I agree that one of the best ways we can respond as a church and community is to support through practical ways those in our midst who are foster and adoptive parents.

      God was incredibly gracious and merciful in a myriad of ways. He still is. The information from this week has been encouraging. It does matter. THEY matter.

      • #65378
        Olivia Milliner
        Participant

        Thank you for sharing your story Debbie! God has surely used you in incredible ways to meet the needs of many children because of you and your husband’s dedication to fulfilling His call. Thank you for encouraging all of us that every ONE life touched matters!

      • #65387
        Connie Becker
        Participant

        Thx for sharing Debbie, Working with vulnerable children is so rewarding but sadly complex at times. Thankful those children that came through your doors had a very special love given to them. I guess with only the grace of God you could have continued to help, seems like it would be so disheartening and want to give up. They will all remember the seeds of hope and love you showed them.

        I pray we can learn from your experience and others in how to help and protect children better.

      • #65429
        Mandy Haffer de Ramírez
        Participant

        You and your husband are SUCH examples for me, Debbie, especially since we work for the same organization and have very similar hearts from all I’ve seen on here so far and what I know of your ministry. Thank you for sharing your perspective!!

      • #65540
        Emily Tiner
        Participant

        Wow, Debbie thank you so much for sharing your story, I’ll definitely remember this. Your heart is incredible and you’re such an example and encouragement in this area. Thank you for letting God love so many children through you and your husband despite the struggle and I’m sure wanting to give up at points, but you put them first and followed the call you felt was on your life in that season and just leaned into the Lord for strength. Those kids were blessed to have you as a safe place.

      • #65541
        Emily Tiner
        Participant

        The Removed Documentary was so heartbreaking and honestly really difficult for me to watch. But I’m thankful they made a documentary to show the unique perspective from the voice of a child and shed so much light on the importance of, whoever is the safe place in the life of that child, to never give up on them, never blame them and always try to understand that there is a root memory or root reason why they’re acting out or struggling to adjust to a new life/new home. My heart was so somber and heavy this week knowing that children walk through this and it just should not be their reality to have to experience feeling unseen and unknown, uncared for and like they don’t matter. My heart breaks during this time of coronavirus that many children in unsafe homes, have to be at home even more because schools are closed. I was really encouraged reading about how the church and community can still play a role even when it’s not directly becoming a foster parent. So just being educated in and knowing now, different ways we can support the foster care community and be part of helping these children and the foster parents, even if we’re not foster parents ourselves. I’m so thankful for this course even more this week and all of you for everything each of you are doing and with the help of Holy Spirit, to help decrease the amount of children day by day, one by one, as much as possible, who feel like they’re forgotten.

    • #65382
      Holly Freitas
      Participant

      I was touched by the ReMoved documentary. It was so painful watching the little girl bond to and then be separated from her little brother. It really brings forth the real need for siblings to be placed together whenever possible. Even that bit of stability in relationship might have helped to temper her deep hurt of separation from her mom and dad. Belonging is a topic that we covered last week, but of course is applicable to this week as well. The sense of belonging to one another, within a family is so very vital to our being. It was just a few months ago that our 3 year old grand-daughter was reviewing over and over who she belongs to. She belongs to us and we belong to her. It was absolutely precious as she created her identity. I can only imagine what it must feel like to not belong to anyone. It breaks my heart.

      We have so much work to do in helping the caregivers in our programs, who have taken children into their homes, to impress upon them the tremendous need for children to feel like they belong and are not just added on, but instead are “grafted” into the family as Diego experienced with his adoptive family.

      • #65545
        Mindy Russell
        Participant

        Holly, thank you for your beautiful perspective. How precious for a child to build their identity within a family, and how heartbreaking it is to think of the loss of that for so many children.

        And yes… siblings need each other so very much. I’ve heard it said that siblings are our longest relationships. They start before we are fully developed adults and usually outlast those of our parents and the village that raises us. It is so important to advocate for this.

    • #65385
      Philip Douce
      Participant

      At the beginning of this week Leah stated this module was designed for the participants to feel the weight of the issue and impact of children in Foster care. And then to make it to the hope that just one person who really cares and is involved can make in the life of a child. I know this truth and believe it. However, I am having a hard time moving to this point. There are so many kids who need just one person really caring for them compared to those who actually have one. I was encouraged sharing with one of our pastors how I feel the body of Christ should be more involved and in particular our church body. He was very open and encouraged me to continue this conversation as we move back to the States.  I am not sure what this means, but am encouraged that it might mean we as a local body of believers might be more open to having a clearer plan of being that one person for more kids in this community.

       

      • #65423
        Ryne Isaac
        Participant

        That’s really encouraging! There are a lot of ways for churches to be involved, even if only one family is fostering. There are a lot of models of wrap around care out there that you can find that show how churches can support foster/adoptive families. Of course CAFO has a lot of great resources on this!

    • #65388
      Connie Becker
      Participant

      The personal stories are so touching good and bad. Picture of concepts you won’t forget like we do so often with facts. Jeff’s One Caring Adult is so true, God doesn’t give us the whole world of vulnerable children to help. He gives us each the individual or individuals we can help. Helps understanding they don’t talk out they act out, because they don’t know how to express their feelings and if they do it makes them vulnerable to possibly more hurt. SPELL TRUST TIME!
      Dieogo Fullers story was a beautiful picture of Gods love, never leave or forsake us. We are engrafted into His family, what a statement and picture to those boys after they burnt the house down.The love they had for him after they understood his love for them, picture of Gods love to us!
      POWER OF PROMISES AND PERMANENCY

      We were told when we started work in uganda, please if you start make sure you are committed, don’t give up and quit. It causes more pain and lose of hope when promises are broken.

      Just being there and sharing ideas it builds up expectations and when they are gone people give up hope and become distrustful. If we are representatives of Christ then we are giving them the wrong picture of who Christ is.

      I also enjoyed the Finding Your Fit in Foster Care. Many of us are involved in all these areas but I have people always say I can’t do what you’re doing. This is a great way to show them all the areas they can help. Finding their gifted areas and help.

    • #65407
      Trent Taylor
      Participant

      When I listened to Josh Shipp’s speech, he made quite a few points that resonated with me. As former foster youth, I could not have concurred more with the statement that every child needs a caring parent. All it takes is for one adult to never give up to change the trajectory of a child’s life. I know this from personal experience. My adoptive family poured into my healing and changed my life. Every child in care has been let down by adults more than once. When a child has an adult that displays love and support consistently and over a long period of time you are able to learn to start trusting again. Like Josh Shipp, I also acted out and tested to see if the adults in my life would let me down again. While I never made it my mission to get removed from a foster home like Josh did,  I certainly tested in order to be certain they are not going to send me away like I had been so many other times. Foster parents need to understand that those of us who have been through trauma must test in order to protect our hearts.

      As I watched the removed documentary, it struck me on a personal level. In addition to the abuse I suffered, I also witnessed some domestic violence. I can relate to almost everything in this video. I know what it was like to travel from home to home and have so much pent up anger and frustration. Just like that little girl, all I wanted was someone to love me and keep me safe. Thankfully, God delivered me to an adoptive family that never gave up on me.

      After coming to dramatic levels of healing I have felt a pull to give back. My mom and I have launched our new ministry called Watch Me Rise. We support a numerous amount of families and children. Our whole goal is to provide them with trauma education through TBRI (my mom is a practitioner) and show them the love and the true healing that is found in God. We are also actively engaging with the public and our local community through public speaking trying to bring awareness to this cause. I am so thankful that I can now use my past experiences to help others. I will continue to speak up and advocate for the children in foster care until there is more than enough.

      • #65497
        Marsha Baker
        Participant

        Trent- your ministry Watch Me Rise sounds incredible.  It is such a need! After having our daughter home a few years we learned about TBRI and it changed everything about how we parent. I am excited to hear yall are out there teaching it more and more!

    • #65420
      Pam Taylor
      Participant

      This module was one that is very near and dear to my heart. As a foster and adoptive parent, as well as a TBRI Practitioner and ministry leader advocating for foster youth and families, this module is so critical in my eyes. Josh Shipp’s speech resonated on so many levels as I heard him voice the truth about how it feels to be in foster care. The truth is, that unless we have walked the journey in the foster system, we can never truly understand. I listened to Josh speak as I sat next to Trent (my 19 year old adopted son) and I watched him shake his head in agreement with so much of what Josh expressed. Fortunately, it only takes one adult to pour into the life of a child from a hard place to change their trajectory. The information this week served as an excellent reminder that it is critical for families who are fostering to truly understand the potential behaviors and reactions that they may see from children who have experienced trauma. It has been quite a while since I have seen “Removed”. It is extremely powerful and I plan to show this video to the families we support. Thank you for the valuable resources and reminders.

    • #65424
      Ryne Isaac
      Participant

      I was listening to Josh Shipp’s “One Caring Adult” while I was out on a run. I’m not an overly emotional person…but I about lost it on my run! I was fighting back the tears as he shared about how literally one adult changed the trajectory of his life. What a great reminder…and an incredible challenge!

      Of course while I write this, my 5 year old adopted son is having a rough morning. Those days don’t go away! But we need reminders along the way of the difference a consistent, loving figure makes in a child’s life.

      • #65495
        Margaret Hoffer
        Participant

        Ryne,

        I agree that Josh’s speech was so encouraging.  We adopted our kiddos 10 years ago and they still have bad days 🙂  I was encouraged to hear that although there were bumps in the road for Rodney and Josh, ultimately what Rodney did had huge impact on Josh’s life.  Something to keep in mind that God is using us to create our kids stories!

      • #66174
        Ana María Sanchez
        Participant

        Ryne! this made me tear up and smile at the same time lol. And you know what? I believe God does the same when He sees us trying so hard to be that “one caring adult” for our kids 🙂 Thank you so much for sharing.

    • #65427
      Heather Hall
      Participant

      I found the foster care stories this week to be especially heartbreaking because of imagining my own niece and nephews being forced into those circumstances.

      One poignant moment for me in the “ReMoved” documentary was when the little girl voiced worry about who would care for her little brother if she wasn’t there to take care of him; imagining a child dealing with that kind of heartache, responsibility, and guilt, in addition to her own incredible pain, is such a difficult thought that I truly do not know how foster care workers can handle the weight of their work.  I know I’ve heard people make similar comments when they hear about some of the global health work I’ve been involved in, so I imagine that one of the first steps in being able to deal with these types of situations on a daily basis is to remember that you are not a savior and that you truly must be okay with doing only what God has given you capacity to do in that given moment.

      The talk by Josh Shipps was phenomenal.  I don’t have much experience or exposure to go on with regard to the US foster care system, but the situation he described is pretty similar to what I had envisioned.  Hearing his story also gave me a lot of compassion and empathy for foster parents, especially those who foster older children.  I’m not sure I would have the patience, strength, and tough skin that would required to endure that type of situation to the point where it would make a difference; foster parents are truly heroes.

      With these things in mind, I think that my personal involvement with foster care would be to come alongside a family that fosters and act as a support to them.  I don’t currently have my own home where I could do something like respite care under my roof, but I could make myself available for errands or other things that would be supportive to a foster care family.  My best friend, who is single, is seriously considering fostering and adoption, so my first step would be with her and to help be a strong part of her support system.  After everything I have read and heard this week, it seems impossible not to move forward without getting involved in one way or another.

    • #65430
      Mandy Haffer de Ramírez
      Participant

      I am a missionary/cross-cultural worker, and actually sent both the ReMoved documentary and the “One Caring Adult” podcast to our support network this week. Both of these were impactful for my husband and me. In the ReMoved documentary, I cried hard at one specific moment… When the third foster mom presented the daughter with a beautiful new dress, only for the daughter to begin screaming “I hate you, I HATE YOU!” as she recalled past moments of trauma. This moment echoed our experience with our foster daughter so powerfully… Not through a dress specifically, but many times that I have put my heart fully out there with our girl only to be crushed by her words or actions. It was a good reminder that while she is responsible for her actions, all that she experienced before coming here is not her fault. I must constantly remember that the way she reacts to me has very little to do with me and very much to do with all she experienced before coming to our family.

      In the same line of thought, my husband and I had come across the One Caring Adult podcast about a month before, and it was a particularly hard day with our daughter. As frustrated as we were with her that day, hearing such a powerful message of encouragement reminded us why in the world we do what we do. Because in loving children from hard places, there is hope! Because so many children like our daughter are only one caring adult away from being a success story.

    • #65494
      Margaret Hoffer
      Participant

      Josh Shipp’s “One Caring Adult Away” speech was one of the most motivational things that I have ever heard.  Our family has felt called to serve older children and that can sometimes feel very daunting.  Hearing Josh’s story and seeing the impact that Rodney had gave me great encouragement.  It also helped me rethink how I go about the relationships with my 5 adopted kids as well as those that God has placed in our family.  It has also helped me reframe how I encourage my friends and colleauges who are also working with vulnerable and at-risk kids.  It is very reassuring to see how God’s plan for the broken is us and that he has created a way for our influence to make a life long impact on a child no matter how old.

      • #66283
        Amber Allan
        Participant

        Margaret, I couldn’t agree more! I actually shared that speech with multiple people because I found it to be impactful like you did. His speech is a great way to encourage those around us.

    • #65496
      Marsha Baker
      Participant

      The stories and articles were really powerful this week! The Removed Documentary really painted a clear picture of foster care that was unlike anything I have seen. It really reiterated the “One Caring Adult Away” idea. It just takes one person not giving up to change a life completely.  I did not grow up in foster care, but I was in an emotionally abusive and neglectful home, BUT I had “one caring adult” and she is the reason I am who I am.  My own experiences and the information this week really motivated me to find ways to support, advocate, and do more! This were also great resources for some friends I have interested, I love the honest and whole picture they give.

    • #65517
      Alyssa McIntyre
      Participant

      I had seen ReMoved before, but I rewatched it as well as the two other short films by the same company. It’s extremely important, I think, to remember that these stories in no way depict the life of every foster child, but as a whole they are certainly a moving reflection of what it means to take in a child who has experienced trauma and the rise and fall of foster care in general.

      I loved the third film’s title “Love Is Never Wasted”- I’ve seen some active foster parents using #gettooattached on Instagram and I think that sends a similar message. This is what terrifies so many people; that they will get too attached, fall in love, and then be forced to let the child go. However that truly is the point and the goal, and if one really leans into foster care you begin to see the beauty in that.

      I loved that the third film also gave a small voice to the biological mother because that’s definitely the one we forget. When I trained to be a CASA I remember them telling us that if we couldn’t think of ANY other strengths for the bio family on our reports we could at least almost always put that they love their children. I was also lucky enough to have a Parent Advocate on one of my cases- a parent volunteer who had gone through the DHS systems themselves and successfully gained their children back. I thought this program was AMAZING because it just proved that so many, in fact, MOST, of these parents really do love and want their children. These films highlighted the idea that, like everything we’re discussing, foster care is ultimately never about us.

      • #65994
        Debbie Douce
        Participant

        Alyssa, I also watched all three of the short films. I had seen Removed many years ago, but not the others. They are definitely moving, and moved me again to tears. I have some clear and very painful memories of children being removed from the emergency shelter where Phil and I were houseparents for their next placement. I am grateful that God has given me deep compassion for the biological parent. His grace allows me to love them as well. What a miracle, truly, because my heart feels so protective of the vulnerable child. I need to find out more about the CASA program. From what little I have learned, it is indeed amazing!!

    • #65544
      Mindy Russell
      Participant

      The ReMoved documentary broke my heart and reminded me of why I was called to work with children in the first place. I began my career 15 years ago as a public school teacher in the USA, and a large part of the student population was from a faith-based institutional foster care program. As these sweet, young kids would filter in and out of my classroom, I saw so many of those behaviors. I cannot imagine the burdens those kids carried with them when they entered my classroom. And though this is not the story for every child in foster care, I want to remember to not let assumptions guide our interactions. Instead of viewing these kids with pity, or labeling them as broken, we should all people with compassion, respect, patience, and the label as a child of God. All of them created with a plan and a purpose. And whether the role in their life is as a coach, an advocate, a prayer warrior, etc. I pray that our actions help foster kids and their families find encouragement, acceptance, help, and a safe place.

      Praying now more than ever for foster families. What a tough season it must be for them.

      • #65549
        Katrina Brown
        Participant

        Mindy, I love what you said here: “…I want to remember to not let assumptions guide our interactions.”

        That is such a big thing and honestly so easy to do with all the stories we hear. I have this week been faced with a lot of subconscious biases I have formed around this topic and I am thankful for that.  But I love how you remind us that label they do carry: child of God. I was just so encouraged by your post and how our actions can affect children in the foster care system and their families.

    • #65548
      Katrina Brown
      Participant

      I am really loving the resources because no matter if I have seen them before or not, having all these resources together create a more holistic picture of foster care.

      The topics this week felt especially heavy in light of everything going on with the coronavirus. I imagine many children, families, and foster families are being greatly impacted and isolated at this time. As a church community we have tried really hard to support our local child welfare office during this time, asking them specifically what they need.

      Foster care is complex and multi-faceted, involving individuals who are affected by daily choices. But I realized this past week how much prayer has not been part of our church community efforts we have emphasized. As a team, we have strived to meet as many needs of foster families and our local child welfare office as we are able, but I believe that prayer is one of the biggest places of need. I hope this does not come across as over-spiritualizing foster care or that prayer makes everything better. But in preparation for Holy Week, I have been reminded that there is a divine power and authority that rules over our world who can make miracles happen, heal, bring community to the lonely, redeem difficult situations, and bring strength when we feel weak and helpless. This past week I have felt particularly called to sit in prayer. Prayer for socially isolated families, foster families, children and families in crisis, social workers, children in foster care homes.

      • #66280
        Mandy Haffer de Ramírez
        Participant

        Hi Katrina! I’ve also been loving the abundance of resources available here. Love your reflection on prayer, especially in this time. Like you, my husband and I have been working to bless/support people in our community experiencing hard times with the Coronavirus, and it is all too easy to think solely in terms of physical needs. Prayer is just as important, if not more. ♥ Thank you for this reminder today!

    • #66173
      Ana María Sanchez
      Participant

      Since in my country we don´t have a foster care system, the resources of this week brought a lot of light and perspective. Removed documentary was heartbreaking in such a necessary way, I think about it whenever I see my kids, and in some way, I don´t feel so far away of understanding them anymore, I ‘ll never be able to feel the same pain or experience what they have experience in their short lives, but I certainly can be that one caring adult that Josh Shipp was talking about, that adult who doesn´t try to “fix them” but who longs for loving them. Because I just can’t stop thinking about how we all have broken pieces, that’s why we need a savior and once again I don’t feel so far away of them anymore, I m not comparing or minimizing their pain and struggle but what I m trying to say is that going through the content of this week pointed me back and back again to the fact that if we walk next to our kids with a humble position by embracing the fact that we are both broken, (and yes broken in different ways), but we have the same all-powerful all healer savior God; we won’t be trying to fix them anymore, but instead we gonna long for God pouring into us so we can pour out love into our kids, and do everything in order for them to have a relationship with God, due to our understanding of God as the font of every restoration.

      • #66401
        Carlos Ramirez
        Participant

        I do agree with your point Ana Maria, It happens the same here sadly in my country we don’t have a system of foster care and we don’t  have many resources for vulnerable children. we wish in the future there can be a system we can be able to reach and help with what we know so we can help lots of children that need a family.

    • #66282
      Amber Allan
      Participant

      For me, the material this week was heart-wrenching, but the type of heart-wrenching that produces a lasting impact. I actually listened to Josh’s talk and watched the documentary first before diving into any other material. They both motivated me to want to know more making everything else I read or heard that much more impactful. I found that after some of the past lessons I was feeling a bit defeated and even questioning how much of an impact we can have on the kids we work with, but the stories this week spoke life into that. Time and time again I was reminded that one committed individual can truly change the trajectory of a child’s life. The adult’s ability to be resilient and persistent in prayer and in action is just as important as the child’s ability to be resilient and withstand the difficulties they face.

      After this week’s material, I find myself latching onto the idea of being committed to the children I serve no matter what. That commitment could change form depending on the child’s needs and the situation but my persistence cannot fade. Each story this week was laced with such deep pain and hurt, but instead of doubting our efforts, we’re called to humbly submit to God and call out to him in prayer constantly. I will commit myself to the work as I am called, but He will forever be the one responsible for the change. That gives me such hope.

    • #66400
      Carlos Ramirez
      Participant

      While we were reading and listen to the that podcast “One Caring Adult” podcast to our support network. Those were impactful for me. Here in my country we don’t have many resources for foster care we do have a system called dinaf and they called families of protection.  We have a foster daughter and it has been an awesome ‘blessing God has put her in our lives but it has been an huge challenge for me personally because we used to do or think just in us and now we are a family of 3 and sometimes its gets hard when she wants to do things in her way, but everyday we try to get her adjusted to us and to everything we do and we try to find a way to do things different that she make like.

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